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Frequently Asked Questions


  • Having a routine comprehensive eye exam every year is the most important thing you can do to prevent or treat computer vision problems. During your exam, be sure to tell your eye doctor how often you use a computer and digital devices at work and at home. Measure how far your eyes are from your screen when you sit at your computer, and bring this measurement to your exam so your eye doctor can test your eyes at that specific working distance.
  • Glare from light reflecting off walls and finished surfaces, as well as reflections on your computer screen or TV screen also can cause computer eye strain. Consider installing an anti-glare screen on your display and, if possible, paint bright white walls a darker color with a matte finish.
  • Adjusting the display settings of your computer or TV can help reduce eye strain and fatigue as Brightness, Picture Size, color temptation etc.

  • The golden rule, of course, would be to avoid exposure to harmful pollutants. On days when the pollution levels are such that there is a public health warning, please stay indoors, especially in the early hours of the morning when the pollution levels are at their peak. In case you cannot avoid exposure to the environment and have to step out, make sure you wear protective eyeglasses which will minimize your exposure to the pollution causing agents.
  • Wash your hands often and try not to touch your eyes
  • Stay hydrated as it will aid in adequate tear formation. It becomes imperative when external factors such as smog increase your chances of dry eyes and eye irritation. Drinking eight to ten glasses of water will be a good choice.
  • Have a healthy diet rich in Omega 3 fatty acid including lots of green leafy vegetables, carrots, spinach, almonds, walnuts, berries and fish which are extremely good for the eyes.
  • Wear sunglasses when outdoors.

  • Dispense remover on cotton pad.
  • Wrap pad around index finger and gently swipe oil over your eyes, mindful not to pull or rub on the skin.
  • Cleanse the rest of your face with normal wash, mindful not to rub the eye area.
  • Rinse with lukewarm water.
  • Pat skin dry with a fresh towel.

  • Rose water has anti-inflammatory properties, so it can help ease symptoms of inflammatory eye disorders like conjunctivitis.
  • Rose water can help prevent dry eyes and cleanse the eyes of dust, reducing the likelihood of developing these conditions.

  • DO NOT touch, rub or apply pressure to the eye.
  • DO NOT try to remove any object stuck in the eye. For small debris, lift eye lid and ask child to blink rapidly to see if tears will flush out the particle. If not, close the eye and seek treatment.
  • Do not apply ointment or medication to the eye.
  • A cut or puncture wound should be gently covered.
  • Only in the event of chemical exposure, flush with plenty of water.

  • The FDA warns that wearing contact lenses can irritate the eyes and lead to pink eye (conjunctivitis), corneal infections, scratches on the cornea, possible impaired vision, and blindness. Allergic reactions are possible too.
  • Putting something into your eye can increase the odds for bacterial infections like keratitis. This can become serious and have irreversible consequences if not handled promptly and properly.
  • Colored contacts sit on top of your cornea just as other contact lenses do. As a result, they have many of the same possible risk factors.
  • Get fitted for colored contacts from an optometrist and obtain a prescription.
  • Replace your colored contacts at the scheduled times, and wear them only as directed. Take them out, dispose of them, and replace them when the manufacturer dictates.

  • Over-the-counter eye drops for itch relief are always helpful.
  • A cold-water compress can relive the itch and have a soothing effect on your eyes. Simply take a clean cloth, soak it in cold water, and apply to closed itchy eyes, repeating as often as needed.
  • If you have a bacterial infection, your doctor will likely prescribe antibiotics in an eye drop format.
  • If you have a chronic or recurring condition that’s causing you eye irritation, you should speak to your doctor.

  • Good eye health starts with the food on your plate. Nutrients like omega-3 fatty acids, lutein, zinc, and vitamins C and E might help ward off age-related vision problems like macular degeneration and cataracts.
  • The right pair of shades will help protect your eyes from the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays. Too much UV exposure boosts your chances of cataracts and macular degeneration.
  • Stop smoking.
  • Being physically active helps you stay healthy. It can also lower your risk of health conditions that can cause eye health or vision problems — like diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.
  • Looking at a computer for a long time can tire out your eyes. Rest your eyes by taking a break every 20 minutes to look at something about 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

  • No, Kajal contains lead which can not only cause itching and irritation in eyes but may also lead to infections.
  • Your child eyes are quite sensitive so not to expose it to infections and irritations by applying carbon-based paste (kajal or surma) in his or her eyes.
  • While applying kajal to your baby’s eyes, if your hands are not hygienic, they may transfer infections to the baby. Also, you might accidentally hurt your baby’s eyes with your nails or fingers while rubbing the kajal on.
  • During a bath, kajal can mix with water, run down and block the opening between your baby’s eyes and nose, causing infections later on.

  • Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water and dry them before you start.
  • Sit in front of a mirror so you can see what you are doing.
  • Take the lid off the ointment, tip your head back and gently pull down your lower eyelid and look up.
  • Hold the tube above the eye and gently squeeze a 1cm line of ointment along the inside of the lower eyelid, taking care not to touch the eye or eyelashes with the tip of the tube.
  • Blink your eyes to spread the ointment over the surface of the eyeball.
  • Wipe away any excess ointment with a clean tissue.Repeat this procedure for the other eye if you have been advised to do so by your doctor or pharmacist.
  • Replace the lid of the tube and take care not to touch the tip of the tube with your fingers.
  • If you are using more than one type of ointment, wait for about half-an-hour before using the next ointment, to allow the first to be absorbed into the eye.
  • If you are also using eye drops use them first, then wait for five minutes before applying the eye ointment.

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